Fountainhead, The (page 9 of 9)

The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here, Gary Cooper as architect Howard Roark standing atop the Wynand Building, the tallest structure in the world. Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.


The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here, Patricia Neal as Dominique Francon (Mrs. Roark) gazing towards the top of the world's tallest building. From the book, 'She saw him standing above her, on the top platform of the Wynand Building. He waved to her. (...) She passed the pinnacles of bank buildings. She passed the crowns of courthouses. She rose above the spires of churches.' Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.


The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here, Patricia Neal as Dominique Francon (Mrs. Roark) in a construction site elevator, rising to the top of the Wynand Building, high above Hell's Kitchen neighborhood. Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.


The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here, the Wynand Building. Eighteen months earlier, Gail Wynand's final words to architect Howard Roark, “Build it as a monument to that spirit which is yours ... and could have been mine.” Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.


The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here, Howard Roark leaving Gail Wynand's office. Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.


The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here in court, Gary Cooper as Howard Roark. He gives his testimony and summation before the jury. "It was believed that my work belonged to others to do with as they pleased. That they had a claim upon me without my consent. That it was my duty to serve them without choice or reward. Now you know why I dynamited Cortlandt. I designed Cortlandt. I made it possible. I destroyed it." Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.


The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here in court, Gary Cooper as Howard Roark. He gives his testimony and summation before the jury. From the film, he starts with: "Thousands of years ago, the first man discovered how to make fire. He was probably burned at the stake he taught his brothers to light. But he left them a gift they had not conceived. And he lifted darkness off the earth." Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.


The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here, the courtroom where Howard Roark defends himself. Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.


The movie "The Fountainhead", directed by King Vidor, screenplay by Ayn Rand, based on her novel of the same name. Seen here, the city room at the Banner newspaper, working on a skeleton crew. Initial theatrical release July 2, 1949. Screen capture. Copyright © 1948 Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. Credit: © 1948 Warner Bros. / Courtesy: Pyxurz.